Full Circle

Last weekend I volunteered at Hoʻoulu ʻĀina through HIHO and Kokua Kalihi Valley (KKV). This was an experience. The 80 or so volunteers gathered in a grass area and naturally put ourselves in a circle without any kind of instruction. I’m lucky to have this experience, meet all the wonderful stewards, and build/learn/share knowledge. Photo by R. Jeung.

This is my 52nd post. Meaning I reached my goal of blogging weekly for a year.

Like the metric of talking to 100 people a week, blogging was an exercise for me to share my perspectives and also keep log of all the ideas and projects I’m actively pursuing.

So what does this mean for you as my audience? Well, I’m planning to shake things up a bit. This year I’m planning to blog a lot more sporadically and naturally.

Fear not.

Do you enjoy getting information regularly? All you have to do is subscribe to my mailing list. Starting at the tail end of March, I’ll be pushing out a monthly newsletter highlighting activities and subjects that are relevant to you.

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Importance of Perspective

A popular meme that can be found by googling “What a customer really needed”

Solution Development Life Cycle (SDLC) consist of steps that are used by developers to plan, design, build, test, and deliver solutions. The basic steps seem simple enough, however, challenges will be presented. Above shows a comic poking fun at everyone’s perspectives.

The plan for the customer is to have a seat that can swing on a tree. As you can see, there are different interpretations. We must take the time to iron out differences. For example, stakeholders must provide clear, purposeful input and feedback while utilizing the expertise of each person (designer, programmer, sales, etc.).

Not all blame should be put on the stakeholder, though. Looking through each panel of the meme, every person involved in a project is guilty of being excessive in different ways. As a team progresses through each step of the cycle, there will be new factors and variables that could affect the original idea. That is why it is important for a stakeholder to not only provide input during the planning stage but offer feedback until the solution is delivered and approved.

Sometimes we just have to laugh about our differences and celebrate when we provide exactly what’s needed. Other times, maybe we need to be conscious about eachother’s strengths and weaknesses.

Do each panel remind you of any team members? Do you need help working together? Let’s talk story, holler @ me.